Tags: Carbenicillin

Penicillins: Side Effects

Another method of combating beta-lactamase-producing organisms has been the development of beta-lactamase inhibitors. Clinical experience with penicillins, especially penicillin G and the aminopenicillins, is extensive. These substances are rarely toxic, even when they are given in an extended range of dosages, making them invaluable for use in pregnant women and children.

Penicillins: Organs and Systems: Liver

Penicillin-induced hepatotoxicity may not be as uncommon as has been thought. There have been three reviews. The first was a comparison of the assessment of drug-induced liver injury obtained by two different methods, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) scale and the Maria & Victorino (M&V) clinical scale. Three independent experts evaluated 215 cases of hepatotoxicity reported using a structured reporting form.

Antibiotic Drugs and Antibiotic Resistance

To understand why antibiotics must be used judiciously, the physician needs to understand how bacteria are able to adapt to their environment. Point mutations can develop in the Deoxyribonucleic acid of bacteria as they replicate. These mutations occur in the natural environment, but are of no survival advantage unless the bacteria are placed under selective pressures.

Urinary Tract Infections and Prostatitis

A urinary tract infection is defined as the presence of microorganisms in the urine that cannot be accounted for by contamination. The organisms have the potential to invade the tissues of the urinary tract and adjacent structures.

Intra-abdominal Infections

Intra-abdominal infections are those contained within the peritoneum or retroperitoneal space. Two general types of intra-abdominal infection are discussed throughout this chapter: peritonitis and abscess.

Central Nervous System Infections

Central nervous system infections include a wide variety of clinical conditions and etiologies: meningitis, meningoencephalitis, encephalitis, brain and meningeal abscesses, and shunt infections. The focus of this chapter is meningitis. N. meningitidis meningitis is the leading cuase of bacterial meningitis in children and young adults in the United States.

Antimicrobial therapy: general principles

A wide variety of antimicrobial agents is available to treat established infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. This section will cover the general principles of antimicrobial therapy and will also include illustrative clinical problems to emphasize proper decision-making in using antimicrobials.

Toxicity of Antimicrobial Therapy

The mechanisms associated with common adverse reactions to antimicrobials include dose-related toxicity that occurs in a certain fraction of patients when a critical plasma concentration or total dose is exceeded, and toxicity that is unpredictable and mediated through allergic or idiosyncratic mechanisms. For example, certain classes of drugs such as the aminoglycosides are associated with dose-related toxicity.

Penicillins

Penicillin G is an acid that is combined with sodium, potassium, procaine, or benzathine to increase its stability or to regulate its absorption. The latter two are “long-acting” forms. Penicillin G is useful in the treatment of streptococcal infections due to S. pyogenes (group A), S. agalactiae (group B), S. pneumoniae, viridans streptococci, Corynebacterium diphtheria, N. meningitidis, many strains of N. gonorrhea, Treponema pallidum, and many anaerobic streptococci, such as peptococcus and peptostreptococcus.

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