Tags: Fungizone

Candidiasis Mucocutaneous

A mucocutaneous disorder caused by infection with various species of Candida. Candida is normally present, in very small amounts, in the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. Genetics: Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome that usually presents in childhood and can have an autosomal recessive, dominant or sporadic mode of inheritance. Sera from HIV-infected patients with thrush have been screened for C. albicans genomic expression.

Blastomycosis

Incidence/Prevalence in USA: Ranges from 0.4-4 cases per 100,000 population per year. Higher prevalence in states bordering the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. Sporadic cases occurring in other areas.

Antifungal Agents

Fungi are eukaryotes, and they share many of the structural and metabolic characteristics of human cells. As a result, designing agents that affect fungi without harming human cells has proved difficult. One major difference between the two cell types is the primary sterol building block used to form the plasma membrane. The fungal plasma membrane consists of ergosterols; the major sterol component of the human plasma membrane is cholesterol.

Antimicrobial therapy: general principles

A wide variety of antimicrobial agents is available to treat established infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. This section will cover the general principles of antimicrobial therapy and will also include illustrative clinical problems to emphasize proper decision-making in using antimicrobials.

Management of Bacterial Meningitis

Meningitis used to be a disease that occurred primarily in children younger than 12 years. The advent of a vaccine for Haemophilus influenzae has led to a marked change in the epidemiology of meningitis in developed countries.

Antifungal Drugs

A number of systemic fungal infections (e.g., histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and paracoccidioidomycosis) can also afflict otherwise healthy persons. Until recently, only amphotericin B was available to treat systemic fungal infection. However, with the rapid development and clinical assessment of azole compounds, a number of these agents are also considered appropriate for treatment of fungal infections.

Amphotericin B (Fungilin, Fungizone, Abelcet, Fungisome, Amphocil)

Systematic drug interaction studies have not been performed to date using amphotericin B cholesteryl sulfate complex, amphotericin B lipid complex, or amphotericin B liposomal. The fact that drug interactions reported with conventional IV amphotericin B could also occur with these lipid-based or liposomal formulations of the drug should be considered.

Amphotericin B

Amphotericin B is active against Absidia spp., Aspergillus spp., Basidiobolus spp., Blastomyces dermatitidis, Candida spp., Coccidioides immitis, Conidiobolus spp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Mucor spp., Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Rhizopus spp., Rhodotorula spp., and Sporothrix schenckii.

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