Tags: Nafcillin

Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome

In the late 1980s, invasive GAS infections occurred in North America and Europe in previously healthy individuals of all ages. This illness is associated with bacteremia, deep soft-tissue infection, shock, multi-organ failure, and death in 30% of cases. StrepTSS occurs sporadically, although minor epidemics have been reported. Most patients present with a viral-like prodrome, history of minor trauma, recent surgery, or varicella infection.

Staphylococci

Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the human skin, vagina, nasopharynx, and gastrointestinal tract. Colonization occurs shortly after birth and may be either transient or persistent. Published studies differ widely in estimates of the prevalence of S aureus carriage.

Primary Bacteremia & Endocarditis

Staphylococci (both S aureus and CoNS) have emerged as the two most common organisms cultured from patients with primary bloodstream infections. The term “primary bacteremia” refers to positive blood cultures without an identifiable anatomic focus of infection. Differentiation of primary bacteremia from infective endocarditis (IE), in which infection of the cardiac valves leads to continuous bacterial seeding of the bloodstream, may challenge even the most experienced clinician. Primary S aureus bacteremia is associated with insulin-dependent diabetes, the presence of a vascular graft, and, most significantly, the presence of an indwelling intravascular catheter.

Penicillins: Organs and Systems: Liver

Penicillin-induced hepatotoxicity may not be as uncommon as has been thought. There have been three reviews. The first was a comparison of the assessment of drug-induced liver injury obtained by two different methods, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) scale and the Maria & Victorino (M&V) clinical scale. Three independent experts evaluated 215 cases of hepatotoxicity reported using a structured reporting form.

Cellulitis Periorbital & Orbital

What Causes Disease? Cellulitis around the eye in adult: Staphylococcus aureus most common, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumonia, Mixed infection.

Cellulitis

An acute, spreading infection of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Several entities are recognized: Treat 10-30 days. Guided by culture results whenever possible.

Brain Abscess

Single or multiple abscesses within the brain, usually occurring secondary to a focus of infection outside the central nervous system. May mimic brain tumor but evolves more rapidly (days to a few weeks). It starts as a cerebritis, becomes necrotic, and subsequently becomes encapsulated.

Anaerobic & Necrotizing Infections

Gangrene is local death of soft tissues due to disease or injury and is associated with loss of blood supply. Anaerobic and necrotizing infections may be associated with gas.