Tags: Timentin

Specific Anti-Infective Agents

Clinicians should be familiar with the general classes of antibiotics, their mechanisms of action, and their major toxicities. The differences between the specific antibiotics in each class can be subtle, often requiring the expertise of an infectious disease specialist to design the optimal anti-infective regimen. The general internist or physician-in-training should not attempt to memorize all the facts outlined here, but rather should read the pages that follow as an overview of anti-infectives. The chemistry, mechanisms of action, major toxicities, spectrum of activity, treatment indications, pharmacokinetics, dosing regimens, and cost are reviewed.

Antimicrobial therapy: general principles

A wide variety of antimicrobial agents is available to treat established infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. This section will cover the general principles of antimicrobial therapy and will also include illustrative clinical problems to emphasize proper decision-making in using antimicrobials.

Ticarcillin Disodium and Clavulanate Potassium

Adverse effects reported with ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium are similar to those reported with ticarcillin alone. For information on adverse effects reported with ticarcillin and other extended-spectrum penicillins, see Cautions in the Extended-Spectrum Penicillins General Statement 8:12.16.16. Rash, pruritus, urticaria, and fever have been reported with ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium.

Ticarcillin Disodium and Clavulanate Potassium: Dosage and Administration

Vials of ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium labeled as containing a combined potency of 3.1 g of the drugs are reconstituted by adding approximately 13 mL of sterile water for injection or sodium chloride injection to provide a solution containing approximately 200 mg of ticarcillin per mL and 6.7 mg of clavulanic acid per mL. The vial should be shaken until the drug is dissolved.

Penicillins

The penicillins comprise several subgroups of agents with a wide range of bacterial coverage and efficacy. Each penicillin molecule contains a basic β-lactam structure fused to a five-membered ring. Because of their broad spectrum of activity and availability in oral form, the penicillins are commonly used in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and have become the drugs of choice in treating many common infections.

Penicillins

The penicillins comprise several subgroups of agents with a wide range of bacterial coverage and efficacy. Each penicillin molecule contains a basic β-lactam structure fused to a five-membered ring. Because of their broad spectrum of activity and availability in oral form, the penicillins are commonly used in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and have become the drugs of choice in treating many common infections. The penicillins are further divided into the following groups: natural penicillins, aminopenicillins, and the extended-spectrum penicillins.

Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis: Current therapies

TABLE: Pharmacological Management of Underlying Disease During an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis summarizes the general pharmacological agents and classes used to manage acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. The primary therapies used in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis treat the causative infection (antibiotics), relieve symptoms (bronchodilators), and treat the underlying inflammation (corticosteroids). TABLE: Current Therapies Used for Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis summarizes the leading antibiotic therapies used to treat the infection.

Sepsis

Sepsis. Description of Medical Condition. Medical Symptoms and Signs of Disease. What Causes Disease?